Picture Me Gone by Meg Rosoff


Picture Me Gone
Title: Picture Me Gone

Rating: Half Cup of Tea

Author: Meg Rosoff

Published by: Penguin Books Ltd

Publication date: September 5 2013

Pages: 208

Genres: Teen Fiction/Mystery

Summary: Mila is on a roadtrip across the USA with her father. They are looking for his best friend but Mila discovers a more important truth. Sometimes the act of searching reveals more than the final discovery can. Adults do not have all the answers. It all depends what questions you ask.
Review:

Picture Me Gone: written by award winning author of How I Live Now. This book seemed like a thrilling, fast-paced mystery that turned out to be a dreary, put-down-able, book that simply lacked a bit of everything. The beginning of the book starts off as though it will lead to something extraordinary and adrenaline packed but once you get past that first chapter you can’t help but think, when is this going to really take off? And you think that for the rest of the book, hoping that at some point something will happen that will change the course of the story.

Mila is an interesting character that I loved to read about. That was probably the only good thing written in all of the 208 pages.

I know this is a short review but I really can’t think of anything else to say. The book was ‘eh’ *shoulder shrug*, and therefore was a massive let down from my original hopes. It sort of explains why most bookshops don’t actually stock the book even though it was written by such a famous, well established, author.

The Mortal Instruments: City of Glass by Cassandra Clare

Title: City of Glass

Rating: Cup of TeaCup of TeaCup of TeaCup of TeaCup of Tea

 

Author: Cassandra Clare

Published by: McElldrey Books

Publication date: March 24 2009

Pages: 576

Genres: Teen Fiction/Fantasy

Summary: With two of the Mortal Instruments now in Valentine’s hands, the world of the Shadowhunters teeters on the brink of civil war. Jace and the Lightwoods are recalled to Idris, the Shadowhunters’ remote and hidden home country, where a search has begun for the last of the Instruments, the Mortal Glass. Clary finds herself caught up in the chaos as the delicate social order of the Nephilim begins to shatter, pitting Downworlder against Downworlder and Shadowhunters against each other. When the City of Glass falls under attack, can Downworlders and Nephilim fight together to defeat Valentine, or will their longstanding hatred destroy them all? And when Clary discovers the unbelievable truth about her own past, can she find Jace before it’s too late?
Review:

City of Glass was the original finale for the mortal instruments series, but being so popular, fans begged Cassandra Clare to continue. This book contains many great plot twists capturing the reader. As soon as you start reading, it is impossible to stop. This book also contains great Clace (Clary and Jace) moments, as well as a huge twist that will leave you wondering ‘what’s next?’ You also see great evolution in our main characters: Clary Fray, Jace Morgenstern, Simon Lewis, Isabelle and Alec Lightwood and the high warlock of Brooklyn, Magnus Bane. The book is constantly filled with suspense, no matter what’s going on, there is always something big going on with some of the characters. After reading the first two books, I couldn’t stop myself from reading the third.
It’s probably just me but in this book I sort of did want to see Clary show a bit of a dark side, maybe join Valentine, but then that i just me. Anyway, if you’re thinking about taking a break after City of Ashes, don’t bother. Personally this was one of my favourite installments.

The Half Life Trilogy: Half Bad by Sally Green

Half BadTitle: Half Bad

Review:  Cup of TeaCup of TeaCup of TeaCup of TeaHalf Cup of Tea
Author: Sally Green
Published by: Puffin Books
Publication date: March 4 2014
Pages: 400
Genres: Young Adult Fiction/ Adventure Fantasy
Summary: You can’t read, can’t write, but you heal fast, even for a witch. You get sick if you stay indoors after dark. You hate White Witches but love Annalise, who is one. You’ve been kept in a cage since you were fourteen. All you’ve got to do is escape and find Mercury, the Black Witch who eats boys. And do that before your seventeenth birthday. Easy.

Waterstones ¦ Amazon

Review:

I found this book when heading to the airport one day, had forgotten to pack enough books. When I saw this book, it immediately caught my eye. It is about a world where witches live in along with normal humans. It follows a boy who’s mum is a white witch but his dad is an evil black witch. It almost seems like a fantasy take on segregation really, yet it’s way more exciting then reading a segregation novel, in my opinion. The book is quite slow paced though, so it takes a while to really get into it. I really did like the idea that no matter who you’re family is, if you’re not the same then they won’t care. It helped the story greatly, giving motive to certain characters and adding a ‘third dimension’ to them. Along the lines of characters, only the main character, Nathan, really develops that much. The rest of the characters do have back stories although quite shallow, they don’t go too far. Overall though, the book was an amazing and an original idea.

My favourite character was Annalise. She might seem like a weak girl but something about her I absaloutely loved.

Another cool thing about this book was how it swapped from first person and second person narrative. It added an interesting way of letting the readers connect with Nathan and almost experience what he was feeling, seeing, smelling and hearing. In my opinion I think that’s what brought the story to life and it must have succeeded in everyone else’s minds as it has been translated into I think around twenty five languages already and has a film deal with Fox.

So I thoroughly reccomened reading this book: even if you find it a little slow at the beginning, believe me when I tell you it gets infinitely better with every sentence, no, every single individual word makes you want to read on.

For Sally Green’s debut book this is definitely a book to remember